1998-2005 Scars Publications Guestbook


I DON REACH HERE MY POEPLE KEEP OFF...
MAGA <MUMU@MAGA.COM>
LA, LA USA - Saturday, January 15, 2005 at 17:10:57 (EST)
NICE SITE PLEASE KEEP OFFFFFF PLEASE
PAUL MAGA <magapaul@maga.net>
togo, ny TOGO - Friday, January 14, 2005 at 04:26:01 (EST)
Tip the world over on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles.
-- Frank Lloyd Wright

If A = B and B = C, then A = C, except where void or prohibited by law.
-- Roy Santoro

Hoagy@yahoo.com>
San Miono, MI USA - Thursday, January 13, 2005 at 23:47:17 (EST)


* bma is a yank
* Knghtbrd is a Knghtbrd
* dhd is also a yank
* Espy is evil
* Knghtbrd believes Espy
Maier's Law:
If the facts do not conform to the theory, they must be disposed of.
-- N.R. Maier, "American Psychologist", March 1960

Corollaries:
(1) The bigger the theory, the better.
(2) The experiment may be considered a success if no more than 50% of the observed measurements must be discarded to obtain a correspondence with the theory.
There is Jackson standing like a stone wall. Let us determine to die, and we will conquer. Follow me.
-- General Barnard E. Bee (CSA)

Casey1@gmail.com>
San Miono, MI USA - Thursday, January 13, 2005 at 23:29:56 (EST)
Thank you for the link to the KB website. I do like your site very much.
Jacqueline Starer <starkera@club-internet.fr>
USA - Thursday, January 13, 2005 at 17:42:10 (EST)
If I hadn\'t been so adamant to get to work...
Bad man <bad man@makemereal.com>
- Thursday, January 13, 2005 at 04:09:37 (EST)
first laboratory in Germany
Hi <hi@0netw0three.com>
- Wednesday, January 12, 2005 at 07:18:27 (EST)
Welcome to my homepage!
Good work <good work@atosportos.com>
- Tuesday, January 11, 2005 at 06:11:51 (EST)
I am heading the Center for Geometry, Imaging, and Virtual Environments
Hello <hello@commoddor.com>
- Monday, January 10, 2005 at 05:56:15 (EST)
Yes! Super site! I like it!
lavasoft adware <lavasoftadware@mylavamail.com>
NY, NY USA - Thursday, January 06, 2005 at 09:39:38 (EST)
Welcome to another of my attempts at a homepage
Welcome <welcome@umomfse.com>
- Thursday, January 06, 2005 at 05:10:48 (EST)
My own research.
good work@ammamateur.com>
- Wednesday, January 05, 2005 at 06:43:53 (EST)
A small group of English soldiers find themselves in a labyrinth of abandoned German trenches in Deathwatch
cinema@tipaau.com>
- Tuesday, January 04, 2005 at 05:53:41 (EST)
Due to some abuses of the questbook we have had to write a filter into the book. If you are a legitimate user operating from the ru or tw Top Level Domains I apologize for this inconvenience. We have been experiencing heavy abuse from these TLDs and have had to block them.
Web Programmer <webmaster@scars.tv>
chicago, il USA - Thursday, December 30, 2004 at 07:23:30 (EST)
Hi,your homepage looks really good and gives great information!
web9112000@yahoo.com>
Philadelphia, PA USA - Wednesday, December 29, 2004 at 11:41:07 (EST)
Hi,your homepage looks really good and gives great information!.
< k222sc@yahoo.com>
Philadelphia, PA USA - Wednesday, December 29, 2004 at 11:40:31 (EST)
Everythig looks good! See you!.
graffito-art@mykemail.com>
NY, NY USA - Wednesday, December 29, 2004 at 07:15:14 (EST)
You have an awesome site. It was lots of help. Keep up the good work.
beyonce
- Wednesday, December 29, 2004 at 03:16:07 (EST)
I must admit that I found this site by mistake but this is a great site!!! I wish more people will invest their time to build sites like this one. Thank you.
< mike@contact-lens-central.com>
USA, USA USA - Monday, December 27, 2004 at 13:45:27 (EST)
Nice site. You are doing a great service to the web.
janet jackson
- Monday, December 27, 2004 at 12:23:22 (EST)
Enjoy browsing.
Welcome <welcome@newageteam.net>
- Monday, December 27, 2004 at 05:47:58 (EST)
Enjoy browsing.
Welcome <welcome@newageteam.net>
- Monday, December 27, 2004 at 03:49:14 (EST)
Congratulations on such a great service!
sendmebooks
- Monday, December 27, 2004 at 03:04:30 (EST)
Nice site. Thank you.
rockpit
- Sunday, December 26, 2004 at 20:06:58 (EST)
Hi. This is a very beautiful site.
- Sunday, December 26, 2004 at 13:34:07 (EST)
You have an awesome site. It was lots of help. Keep up the good work.
madeline
- Sunday, December 26, 2004 at 06:35:25 (EST)
Nice site. Thank you.
fcpoli
- Saturday, December 25, 2004 at 23:29:09 (EST)
Impressing Page.
- Saturday, December 25, 2004 at 16:17:28 (EST)
I enjoy your site. Must be a lot of work to keep it up to date
- Saturday, December 25, 2004 at 09:22:10 (EST)
I enjoyed your site.
- Friday, December 24, 2004 at 20:37:09 (EST)
What a well done website!
- Friday, December 24, 2004 at 13:26:43 (EST)
I love your website.
avril lavigne
- Friday, December 24, 2004 at 06:33:17 (EST)
Congratulations on such a great service!
britney spears
- Thursday, December 23, 2004 at 16:43:25 (EST)
Amazing website!
< - Thursday, December 23, 2004 at 08:17:58 (EST)
Very interesting...
hello@amateurfrank.com>
- Thursday, December 23, 2004 at 05:02:09 (EST)
Ye-ah! Wonderfull site!
spyware-blaster@mysuperhotmail.com>
NY, NY USA - Tuesday, December 21, 2004 at 11:44:33 (EST)
Rock and roll is here to stay The king is gone but he's not forgotten
It's better to burn out This is the story of a Johnny Rotten
Than to fade away It's better to burn out than it is to rust
My my, hey hey The king is gone but he's not forgotten

It's out of the blue and into the black Hey hey, my my
They give you this, but you pay for that Rock and roll can never die
And once you're gone you can never come back There's more to the picture
When you're out of the blue Than meets the eye
And into the black
-- Neil Young
"My My, Hey Hey (Out of the Blue), Rust Never Sleeps"

What no spouse of a writer can ever understand is that a writer is working when he's staring out the window.
Casey1@gmail.com>
San Miono, MI USA - Saturday, December 18, 2004 at 21:52:19 (EST)


I used to live in a house by the freeway. When I went anywhere, I had to be going 65 MPH by the end of my driveway.
I replaced the headlights in my car with strobe lights. Now it looks like I'm the only one moving.
I was pulled over for speeding today. The officer said, "Don't you know the speed limit is 55 miles an hour?" And I said, "Yes, but I wasn't going to be out that long."
I put a new engine in my car, but didn't take the old one out. Now my car goes 500 miles an hour.
-- Steven Wright

BOFH Excuse #291:
Due to the CDA, we no longer have a root account.
You can go anywhere you want if you look serious and carry a clipboard.

a href="mailto:Yogi_mo@freedom.com">Yogi_mo@freedom.com>
San Miono, MI USA - Saturday, December 18, 2004 at 21:35:45 (EST)


I really like it! Logo is the best! Keep your site!
spyware-removal@spy_mysuperhotmail.com>
NY, NY USA - Friday, December 17, 2004 at 05:07:27 (EST)
Let this be a lesson to you!
Science <science@ycuken.com>
- Thursday, December 16, 2004 at 07:30:13 (EST)
Binary star.
Armageddon <bgrvtbaa@mail.ru>
- Tuesday, December 14, 2004 at 05:45:27 (EST)
Welcome to Madison
Anna\'s Bears <f2ohzlqu@mail.ru>
- Saturday, December 11, 2004 at 02:48:34 (EST)
New design style
Art Nuvo <xccdtp29@mail.ru>
- Friday, December 10, 2004 at 11:19:19 (EST)
Cool site! I like it!
spyware-stormer@mysuperhotmail.com>
NY, NY USA - Wednesday, December 08, 2004 at 06:27:30 (EST)
Is everything ok?...
Svinazer <3bc5nm5w@mail.ru>
- Tuesday, December 07, 2004 at 19:02:58 (EST)
I WILL NOT SPANK OTHERS
I WILL NOT SPANK OTHERS
I WILL NOT SPANK OTHERS
I WILL NOT SPANK OTHERS

Bart Simpson on chalkboard in episode 8F14

"I'd love to go out with you, but my favorite commercial is on TV."
JimiXex@yahoo.co.uk>
San Diego, Ca USA - Tuesday, December 07, 2004 at 15:49:59 (EST)


"I might have liked Zap Brannigan if he weren't a pompous dimwit who threw
me in prison." -Leela "You really are too picky."
-Bender
"Out of register space (ugh)"
-- vi
Spreading peanut butter reminds me of opera!! I wonder why?

Fats_32@mail.com>
San Diego, Ca USA - Tuesday, December 07, 2004 at 15:25:17 (EST)
Is everything ok?...
Svinazer <oqiwjkii@mail.ru>
- Tuesday, December 07, 2004 at 14:53:06 (EST)
A great site! I love it. I also feel privileged to be able to contribute the occasional poem among so many wonderful poems and other so-interesting items.
Roger Taber <rogertab@aol.com>
London, UK - Sunday, December 05, 2004 at 07:20:40 (EST)
Nice site!
AmericanWolf <rtf@mail.ru>
- Sunday, December 05, 2004 at 00:23:27 (EST)
Please, don't be cruel!
Kompaniets <rtf@mail.ru>
- Thursday, December 02, 2004 at 02:09:17 (EST)
Osemdesiatka? Co im drbe?? Ved idem 140...
Gliiip
I'm young ... I'm HEALTHY ... I can HIKE THRU CAPT GROGAN'S LUMBAR REGIONS!
"I shall expect a chemical cure for psychopathic behavior by 10 A.M. tomorrow,
or I'll have your guts for spaghetti."
c-- a comic panel by Cotham

Machinetop@bmw.com>
San Diego, Ca USA - Monday, November 29, 2004 at 10:11:14 (EST)
Only a mediocre person is always at his best.
-- Laurence Peter
< jaybonci > actually d-i stands for "divine intervention" ;)
-- in #debian-devel

Peanut Blossoms

4 cups sugar 16 tbsp. milk
4 cups brown sugar 4 tsp. vanilla
4 cups shortening 14 cups flour
8 eggs 4 tsp. soda
4 cups peanut butter 4 tsp. salt
Shape dough into balls. Roll in sugar and bake on ungreased cookie
sheet at 375 F. for 10-12 minutes. Immediately top each cookie with a
Hershey's kiss or star pressing down firmly to crack cookie. Makes a
heck of a lot.

Hoagy@gmail.com>
San Diego, Ca USA - Monday, November 29, 2004 at 09:49:17 (EST)


Hands off!
Saddam <rtf@mail.ru>
- Sunday, November 28, 2004 at 23:34:36 (EST)
Well, what else could I say...
Vikko Joe <rtf@mail.ru>
- Friday, November 26, 2004 at 02:59:38 (EST)
Auribus teneo lupum.
[I hold a wolf by the ears.]
[Boy, it *sounds* good. But what does it *mean*?]

What is firmly established cannot be uprooted.
What is firmly grasped cannot slip away.
It will be honored from generation to generation.

Cultivate Virtue in your self,
And Virtue will be real.
Cultivate it in the family,
And Virtue will abound.
Cultivate it in the village,
And Virtue will grow.
Cultivate it in the nation,
And Virtue will be abundant.
Cultivate it in the universe,
And Virtue will be everywhere.

Therefore look at the body as body
; Look at the family as family;
Look at the village as village;
Look at the nation as nation;
Look at the universe as universe.

How do I know the universe is like this?
By looking!
The difference between waltzes and disco is mostly one of volume.
-- T.K.

Machinetop@freedom.com>
San Diego, Ca USA - Thursday, November 25, 2004 at 19:54:01 (EST)


Boys, you have ALL been selected to LEAVE th' PLANET in 15 minutes!!
No, I'm not going to explain it. If you can't figure it out, you didn't want to know anyway... :-)
-- Larry Wall in <1991Aug7.180856.2854@netlabs.com>
Free yourself from negative influence. Negative thoughts are the old habits that gnaw at the roots of the soul.
Moses Shongo, (Seneca)

Catfishy@hello.com>
San Diego, Ca USA - Thursday, November 25, 2004 at 19:33:31 (EST)
If for every rule there is an exception, then we have established that there is an exception to every rule. If we accept "For every rule there is an exception" as a rule, then we must concede that there may not be an exception after all, since the rule states that there is always the possibility of exception, and if we follow it to its logical end we must agree that there can be an exception to the rule that for every rule there is an exception.
-- Bill Boquist
Mos Eisley Spaceport; you will never find a more wretched hive of scum
and villainy...
-- Obi-wan Kenobi, "Star Wars"
Beneath a world -- in its rocks, its dirt and sedimentary overlays -- there you find the planet's memory, the complete analog of its existence, its ecological memory.
-- PARROT KYNES, An Arrakis Primer

jDoc@hello.com>
San Diego, Ca USA - Sunday, November 21, 2004 at 10:30:01 (EST)
"Nobody needs to tell me what I believe. But I do need somebody to tell me where Kosovo is."

George W. Bush
August 25, 1999
Quoted in Talk.

"Those of us who spent time in the agricultural sector and in the heartland, we understand how unfair the death penalty is---the death tax is. I don't want to get rid of the death penalty, just the death tax."

George W. Bush
February 28, 2001
Never give an inch!

Fats@bmw.com>
San Diego, Ca USA - Sunday, November 21, 2004 at 10:09:45 (EST)


Das ist gut!
linuxogen@hotmail.com>
NY, NY USA - Friday, November 19, 2004 at 13:35:17 (EST)
The Blue Screen Of Advocacy

The Federal Bureau of Investigation & Privacy Violations has issued a
national advisory warning computer stores to be on the lookout for the
"Bluescreen Bandits". These extreme Linux zealots go from store to store
and from computer to computer typing in "C:\CON\CON" and causing the demo
machines to crash and display the Blue Screen Of Death.

Efforts to apprehend the bandits have so far been unsuccessful. The
outlaws were caught on tape at a CompUSSR location in Southern California,
but in an ironic twist, the surveillance system bluescreened just before
the penguinistas came into clear view.

"We don't have many clues. It's not clear whether a small group is behind
the bluescreen vandalism, or whether hundreds or even thousands of geek
zealots are involved," said the manager of a Capacitor City store.

The manager has good reason to be upset. The bluescreen raid was the top
story in the local newspaper and quickly became a hot topic of discussion.
As a result, the local school board halted its controversial plans to
migrate their computers from Macs to PCs.

my ex girlfriends nickname is asuka
german with red hair perchance? :)
no, black hair
sorry that i cant make your sick mind happy :P
I'm also pre-POURED pre-MEDITATED and pre-RAPHAELITE!!


Casey1@peace.com

San Francisco, Ca USA - Thursday, November 18, 2004 at 01:08:36 (EST)


"Success covers a multitude of blunders."
-- George Bernard Shaw
When the government bureau's remedies don't match your problem, you modify
the problem, not the remedy.
History shows that the human mind, fed by constant accessions of knowledge,
periodically grows too large for its theoretical coverings, and bursts them
asunder to appear in new habiliments, as the feeding and growing grub, at
intervals, casts its too narrow skin and assumes another... Truly the imago
state of Man seems to be terribly distant, but every moult is a step gained.
-- Charles Darwin, from "Origin of the Species"

Mickey@bmw.com
San Francisco, Ca USA - Thursday, November 18, 2004 at 00:54:52 (EST)


This is really amazing page! Wanna express my deepest respect to authors! Best regards!
New York, Florida USA - Wednesday, November 17, 2004 at 09:02:59 (EST)
This site rocks!
New York, Kansas USA - Monday, November 15, 2004 at 12:38:21 (EST)
You know you're using the computer too much when: have withdraw symptoms.. which gives you the urge to get on the nearest computer. even if its a redmond-run os -- KingPunk
Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it is too dark to read.
All syllogisms have three parts, therefore this is not a syllogism.

Chi34@peace.com
San Diego, Ca USA - Monday, November 15, 2004 at 01:35:11 (EST)
A vacuum is a hell of a lot better than some of the stuff that nature replaces it with.
-- Tennessee Williams
I must have a prodigious quantity of mind; it takes me as much as a week sometimes to make it up.
-- Mark Twain, "The Innocents Abroad"
It is your concern when your neighbor's wall is on fire.
-- Quintus Horatius Flaccus (Horace)

Machinetop@msn.com
San Diego, Ca USA - Monday, November 15, 2004 at 01:15:49 (EST)
Your site was benefit to me. Thanks!
nutrifly@yahoo.com
New York, NY USA - Sunday, November 14, 2004 at 08:12:33 (EST)
This site rocks!
hi tech
New York, Kansas USA - Saturday, November 13, 2004 at 05:17:25 (EST)
This site rocks!
Mesothelioma Lawyers
Boston, MA USA - Friday, November 12, 2004 at 00:57:24 (EST)
Thanks so much for the info, I love your site! Much success for the future
jsublett@sfaweb.com
Lethbridge, Alberta Canada - Thursday, November 11, 2004 at 07:54:46 (EST)
"And the true threats of the 21st century are the ability for some rogue leader to say to the United States, to Europe, to Russia herself, to Israel, don't you dare move, don't you dare try to express your freedom, otherwise we'll blow you up." George W. Bush July 20, 2001 BBC Interview
Thou didst divide the sand by thy strength; Thou breakest the heads of the dragons in the desert. Yea, I behold thee as a beast coming up from the dunes; thou hast the two horns of the lamb, but thou speakest as the dragon.
-- Revised Orange Catholic Bible Arran 11:4
We don't need no stinkin' bahdges!
-- "The Treasure of Sierra Madre" bahd

Buddy555@yahoo.co.uk
San Francisco, Ca USA - Wednesday, November 10, 2004 at 23:09:28 (EST)
Has your family tried 'em? # POWDERMILK BISCUITS Heavens, they're tasty and expeditious! They're made from whole wheat, to give shy persons the strength to get up and do what needs to be done. POWDERMILK BISCUITS Buy them ready-made in the big blue box with the picture of the biscuit on the front, or in the brown bag with the dark stains that indicate freshness. It is wrong always, everywhere and for everyone to believe anything upon insufficient evidence. - W. K. Clifford, British philosopher, circa 1876 "You are old," said the youth, "and your jaws are too weak For anything tougher than suet; Yet you finished the goose, with the bones and the beak -- Pray, how did you manage to do it?" bon "In my youth," said his father, "I took to the law, And argued each case with my wife; ook And the muscular strength which it gave to my jaw, Has lasted the rest of my life." "You are old," said the youth, "one would hardly suppose That your eye was as steady as ever; ulYet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose -- What made you so awfully clever?" "I have answered three questions, and that is enough," Said his father. "Don't give yourself airs! Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff? Be off, or I'll kick you down stairs!"
Casey1@yahoo.de
San Francisco, Ca USA - Wednesday, November 10, 2004 at 22:25:09 (EST)
i really like this site. after being rejected for publication so amny times it's nice to fet my poetry out there
Bambie Starrbambiestarr@yahoo.com
Buchanan, Mi USA - Wednesday, November 10, 2004 at 17:18:09 (EST)
Thanks for having such an awsome site.Keep up the great work.
Jennie Pittspoet69@hotmail.com
Mobile, AL USA - Tuesday, November 09, 2004 at 20:39:29 (EST)
interesting site, great site
Offshore Asset Protection
usa - Monday, November 08, 2004 at 13:08:02 (EST)
The nicest thing about the Alto is that it doesn't run faster at night.
Ever feel like life was a game and you had the wrong instruction book?
It is not good for a man to be without knowledge, and he who makes haste with his feet misses his way. -- Proverbs 19:2

Hoagy@usa.net
San Francisco, Ca USA - Monday, November 08, 2004 at 01:34:40 (EST)
This site rocks!
hi tech
New York, Kansas USA - Saturday, November 06, 2004 at 11:50:12 (EST)
awesome site! i like it too much
suzy
Alesund, Nikol USA - Saturday, November 06, 2004 at 11:43:51 (EST)
This site rocks!
hi tech
New York, Kansas USA - Saturday, November 06, 2004 at 11:34:37 (EST)
awesome site! i like it too much
suzy
Alesund, Nikol USA - Saturday, November 06, 2004 at 11:29:15 (EST)
Bugaga! Lets check it!
Fiona
New York, Kansas USA - Saturday, November 06, 2004 at 07:52:52 (EST)
This is really amazing page! Wanna express my deepest respect to authors! Best regards!
Miami
New York, Florida USA - Friday, November 05, 2004 at 07:15:27 (EST)
This is really amazing page! Wanna express my deepest respect to authors! Best regards!
fgfd
USA - Thursday, November 04, 2004 at 07:09:16 (EST)
Any fool can tell the truth, but it requires a man of sense to know how to lie well.
-- Samuel Butler

'm often asked the question, "Do you think there is extraterrestrial intelli- gence?" I give the standard arguments -- there are a lot of places out there, and use the word *billions*, and so on. And then I say it would be astonishing to me if there weren't extraterrestrial intelligence, but of course there is as yet no compelling evidence for it. And then I'm asked, "Yeah, but what do you really think?" I say, "I just told you what I really think." "Yeah, but what's your gut feeling?" But I try not to think with my gut. Really, it's okay to reserve judgment until the evidence is in.
- Carl Sagan, The Burden Of Skepticism, The Skeptical Inquirer, Vol. 12, Fall 87

Hey! now! Come hoy now! Whither do you wander? Up, down, near or far, here, there or yonder? Sharp-ears, Wise-nose, Swish-tail and Bumpkin, White-socks my little lad, and old Fatty Lumpkin!
> -- J. R. R. Tolkien

Texj@whitehouse.com
San Diego, Ca USA - Wednesday, November 03, 2004 at 04:33:06 (EST)


Then there was the Formosan bartender named Taiwan-On. You buttered your bread, now lie in it. Q: What do you get when you cross the Godfather with an attorney? A: An offer you can't understand.
Buddy555@russia.ru
San Diego, Ca USA - Wednesday, November 03, 2004 at 04:13:28 (EST)
Das ist gut!
linuxogen@hotmail.com
NY, NY USA - Sunday, October 31, 2004 at 19:08:24 (EST)
Prejudice: A vagrant opinion without visible means of support. -- Ambrose Bierce Technology is a constand battle between manufacturers producing bigger and more idiot-proof systems and nature producing bigger and better idiots. -- Slashdot signature "Turn on, tune up, rock out." -- Billy Gibbons
jDoc@hello.com
San Diego, Ca USA - Sunday, October 31, 2004 at 18:54:17 (EST)
Dude! That movie was fucking sweet! The meek shall inherit the earth, but *not* its mineral rights. -- J.P. Getty It is only by risking our persons from one hour to another that we live at all. And often enough our faith beforehand in an uncertified result is the only thing that makes the result come true. -- William James
Killerm@comeback.com
San Diego, Ca USA - Wednesday, October 13, 2004 at 14:19:37 (EDT)
Thank you for this site. Hope to get information.
frdedeweb@hotmail.net
- Monday, October 11, 2004 at 07:01:07 (EDT)
Excellent site. Keep up the good work.
adultchat@hotmail.net
- Saturday, October 09, 2004 at 10:58:58 (EDT)
Great page !
modeddd100@hotmail.net
- Saturday, October 09, 2004 at 07:58:44 (EDT)
Nice site. Easy to use.
freecams@hotmail.net
- Saturday, October 09, 2004 at 04:14:08 (EDT)
Another such victory over the Romans, and we are undone. -- Pyrrhus It is easier to run down a hill than up one. "sic transit discus mundi" (From the System Administrator's Guide, by Lars Wirzenius)
Fats@peace.com
New York, NY USA - Friday, October 08, 2004 at 20:50:51 (EDT)
BOFH Excuse #320: You've been infected by the Telescoping Hubble virus. I'm having an EMOTIONAL OUTBURST!! But, uh, WHY is there a WAFFLE in my PAJAMA POCKET?? curtation, n.: The enforced compression of a string in the fixed-length field environment. The problem of fitting extremely variable-length strings such as names, addresses, and item descriptions into fixed-length records is no trivial matter. Neglect of the subtle art of curtation has probably alienated more people than any other aspect of data processing. You order Mozart's "Don Giovanni" from your record club, and they invoice you $24.95 for MOZ DONG. The witless mapping of the sublime onto the ridiculous! Equally puzzling is the curtation that produces the same eight characters, THE BEST, whether you order "The Best of Wagner", "The Best of Schubert", or "The Best of the Turds". Similarly, wine lovers buying from computerized wineries twirl their glasses, check their delivery notes, and inform their friends, "A rather innocent, possibly overtruncated CAB SAUV 69 TAL." The squeezing of fruit into 10 columns has yielded such memorable obscenities as COX OR PIP. The examples cited are real, and the curtational methodology which produced them is still with us. MOZ DONG n. Curtation of Don Giovanni by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Lorenzo da Ponte, as performed by the computerized billing ensemble of the Internat'l Preview Society, Great Neck (sic), N.Y. -- Stan Kelly-Bootle, "The Devil's DP Dictionary"
Bing@peace.com
San Diego, Ca USA - Tuesday, October 05, 2004 at 22:20:53 (EDT)
Is this Ben Whitmer the same punk rock freak I knew in Colorado?
Jessiethezebragirl@yahoo.com
L.A., CA USA - Tuesday, October 05, 2004 at 16:15:17 (EDT)
Thanks it was a great web page.
splashik@domail.com
Northrhine-Westfalia, Gelsenkirchen Germany - Sunday, September 26, 2004 at 20:49:15 (EDT)
Just dropping in to let you know you have an interesting site. I hope you'll continue to work on it. Wishing you all the best. hobbosyn@thewebpost.com
Abbotsford, British Columbia Canada - Sunday, September 26, 2004 at 10:13:22 (EDT)
Through your devoted efforts your site is adding to the sum total of enlightenment in the world many thanks zendo http://oshana.org/
Enlightenmentzendo@yahoo.kr
NY , NY USA - Tuesday, September 10, 2002 at 07:03:17 (PDT)
it cut out the last peron's quote... It was that If god is what he is supposed to be, can he create a stone so heavy that he is not able to lift?
Alexandria again
USA - Saturday, June 22, 2002 at 07:47:36 (PDT)
the last person wrote: ÒIf god is what he is supposed to be, can he create a stone so heavy that he is not able to lift?Ó

And that makes me think of the Simpsons where Homer asked Ned Flanders if Jesus could make a burrito SO hot that even HE couldn't eat it? Beautiful question you posed, there...
alexandriaalexrand@scars.tv
chicago, il USA - Saturday, June 22, 2002 at 07:46:20 (PDT)


These are the words of a drunk man. Don't take them too seriously. The depressed mind seeks answers. Answers that are important to those who suffer. Questions are worse than answers. Confusion ... Taking things for granted.Questioning so-called geniouses. Worrying about serotonin levels. Trying to lead a fast life. Resolve your sexual issues! Free speech. Lost train of thought. Submitting. Fucking insecurity. Low frequencies. High frequencies. Be influential. Keep a low profile. Wear underpants. Have to argue. Fucking DNA, what have you done to me!? Study what you cannot handle. I cannot believe I am writing this. If god is what he is supposed to be, can he create a stone so heavy that he is not able to lift?
nick lavdasnoulou@noulou.com
London, GB - Saturday, May 04, 2002 at 18:35:13 (PDT)
Many thanks for having such a great site to look and gain knowledge from. I am an aspiring writer of poetry and looking for a publisher who will like my work and be able to publish the work I have already done on several sites. http://Stories.com/authors/poeticbear, and also Poetry.com plus Famous Poets,com and American Society of Poets.com all of which have my work displayed there. Thank you for the time in reading this signing of your guestbook.
Cubby Brickhousejblckglove@mail.clis.com
Newport, NC United States - Tuesday, April 30, 2002 at 12:55:25 (PDT)
Your contest entry is a little steep but I migh consider it.
mis_behavin
oh USA - Sunday, April 07, 2002 at 09:32:13 (PDT)
The Still Horizon pp. 246 ISBN 81-901366-0-7. In this anthology 235 poems of 225 eminent poets have been published. The anthology is an attempt to select the best of world poetry.We trust that the anthology will prove to be an extraordinary collection. You will also get an opportunity to read the poems from around the world. The Still Horizon is dedicated to the victims of terrorist attack of September11,2001. How To Order The Book? ******************** To view The Still Horizon and to order it online please click here http://www.cyberwit.net/new.htm If unable to pay online,you may kindly send $15 per copy only by International Money Order/Cashier Check/Personal Check/Bank Draft payable in favour of RADHA AGRAWAL at the following address. This amount includes postal and handling charges also. If you have any query please write to us. A reply will oblige. Best Wishes RADHA AGRAWAL The Editor Managing http://www.cyberwit.net 4/2 B, L.I.G. Govindpur Colony Allahabad - 211004 (U.P.) INDIA
Radhahttp://cyberwit.net/new.htm
allahabad, UP India - Saturday, April 06, 2002 at 21:48:52 (PST)
i saw the last guy's question about an oil painting, and i do not know where you saw the name (it didn't appear in the text for the cc&d art page), so i have no idea what it is in reference to. if you want to post the info here, or e-mail me with that info, and i might be able to help you out. - janet
janetccandd96@aol.com
gurnee, il USA - Tuesday, September 25, 2001 at 07:37:52 (PDT)
I have an oil painting signed RR Potter,1934, could this be the same artist mentioned on your site?
JWKJwkartcollector@aol.com
CA USA - Saturday, September 15, 2001 at 20:34:14 (PDT)
Hi from france !
trance mp3
France - Wednesday, September 12, 2001 at 07:39:38 (PDT)
Time: 1998-06-21 14:45:00 Comments: I loved your site. Thanks for inviting me to such a wonderful and imaginative site.
WhiteWolf
CA USA - Wednesday, February 14, 2001 at 13:26:49 (PST)
Sorry about the massive reconstruction project. We are migrating from an NT server to a Unix server so I must rewrite all of the ASP scripts. Let me know if you find any technical problems with the web site. I'll try to get them fixed as quickly as possible.
John Yotkoentropy76@hotmail.com
Gurnee, IL USA - Wednesday, February 14, 2001 at 13:07:57 (PST)
Welcome to the Scars guestbook for writings in CC&D!!! Let us know what you think, or feel free to post writings in this space as well. You can also e-mail us if you have any comments or questions about these pages, and thanks for stopping by!
Janet Kuypersccandd96@aol.com
Gurnee, IL USA - Wednesday, February 14, 2001 at 11:27:18 (PST)


Re: silent prayers
by: shannon peppers
12/05/00 10:09 am EST

cool writings on the page, angel.


Re: who's your daddy? your daddy's who?
by: marina arturo
12/05/00 10:08 am EST

cool entry, mulrooney. my email isn't working so i have to post that here... it was nice to see your work on the board!


who's your daddy? your daddy's who?
by: Christopher Mulrooney
lospoesy@earthlink.net
11/27/00 12:13 pm EST

how like commissars the anchors are
how like smiling little commissars
or weeping weeping little commissars

how close the New York news is to a POTUS Ôputer
and bronzes

well you have the mob ruling anonymously
until an oligarch finesses a coalition
he liquidates of course
and then you have to kiss his ass
personally

clap clap harder
the cowÕs in the garden
sink me
sink me
hoist me now
hoist me
rinse and repeat


silent prayers
by: Angel
ash77@grics.net
10/20/00 09:28 am EDT

I lived my life by what was given to me,
but it was never much to last long.
my brother and I hid from people everywhere,
tried to hide from pain as we ran into it.
we always had a mother just never a father,
she switched from man to man onto another.
I always prayed for a better life and father,
they were always silent prayers I never let her know.
she married one day and almost died another,
my step-father said her loved her by hitting her daily.
she always told everyone she loved her two kids,
she loved them enough to let them be abused and watch.
I prayed for a new family and for someone to love,
and I kept it silent and no one ever knew my thoughts.
one unlucky day this man tried to force himself on me,
and mother would believe him over me when told.
I was a liar and a home wrecker they said,
I prayed my silent prayers to stop the wrenching hurt,
God was the only one who heard my prayers,
then he answered them.


believe
by: Angel
ash77@grics.net
10/20/00 09:19 am EDT

A child so innocent to the wise man's ways,
and so longing to embrace the knowledge he holds.
I want to tear apart the world he loves and show him reality,
a child so small and tender,
to be loved for their innocence not for his leisurely desire.
hi thinks I do not know what I say,
but I know it like the images that flash through my tear soaked eyes.
he says no when I say yes it did happen,
no one can ever take the past away or the bad memories.
so cowardly he sits on his tattered throne,
he thinks he is so invincible to the realities of life,
when in actual reality he has no life and never will.
he has taken the innocence of a child so lonely,
and denies his act of pleasure as though it never was.
he will burn in hell and I will sit with God and those who believed,
and we will pray for his soul as long as it takes for him to believe.


i'm in the new book of cc&d's
by: sydney anderson (est winner)
sydneyhelena@aol.com
08/17/00 12:08 pm EDT

hi... just found out of cc&d that a bit of my writing is going to be in their new book, which is cool by me. maybe they like me beacuse i was the winner of their book contest award a few years back. i was just going to say that i thought it was cool.


slate and marrow book comments that scar
08/17/00 12:05 pm EDT

...Absolutely beautiful. Very impressive. Congratulations. Haven't had a chance to read much yet, but I loved the poem "Clipping Koltin." The photography looks great.


sulphur and sawdust comments
08/17/00 12:04 pm EDT

I'm enjoying the copy of "Suphur and Sawdust," which came in the mail yesterday. The design is phenomenal. Stark, sleek, brilliant, impressive. Very refreshing. The small lines of text running sideways down the pages? Very cool. This is really, well-done, classy looking anthology.


blister and burn - book comments
08/17/00 12:00 pm EDT

Blister and Burn (is a) collection the admitably fulfills the promise of its title. I'm amazed at how much (Kuypers) accomplishes and gets done. She is listening hard for the authentic voices of America.

---

Thank you - (Kuypers has) really outdone herself with Blister and Burn. What a great volume, and your work is quite compelling! Marvelous job.

---

Blister and Burn arrived today. It's quite handsome, attractive format, clean and uncluttered.
Congratulations on the publication....good work!


response to last interactive poem
by: gabriel athens
gathens@aol.com
03/30/00 05:15 pm EST

sorry to add this, but that sounds cool. like your use of language.


poem addition
by: Michel Duncan Merle
lightplume@aol.com
03/30/00 05:14 pm EST

You can't just write about it
It has to grab you by the neck
It has to squeeze t'il your eyes pop out
It has to make you choke on your brilliant idea
And then It can start to be compelling
It can then be something worth repeating
It will then sound like a poem


moonlight
by: janet
jkuypers22@aol.com
02/08/00 11:26 am EST

moonlight is a hypnotist/putting people in a trance
whenever you look at it
it takes over your soul
no one can stop it
but no one wants to...


rose
by: Jean Hellemans 02/08/00 11:24 am EST

Jean Hellemans
Website: b&j
Referred by: Just Surfed On In!
From: Belgium
Time: 1997-12-01 18:21:00

Comments: This is a rose That is a angel So be gentel with the rose and never lost the angel out of your vieuw my heart is always with You my body somtemps not but my love is forever


tall man
by: janet
jkuypers22@aol.com
02/08/00 11:25 am EST

janet kuypers
Website: the poetry page
Referred by: Word of Mouth
From: chicago, illinois
Time: 1997-11-30 22:41:00
Comments:

TALL MAN

I can feel your presence
across the room
a movement a stir

your long shadow
stretches across the walls

a stranger
yet i feel i know you
all too well


comments
by: pbn
02/08/00 11:23 am EST

Poem by Nari
Website: R E A L I Z A T I O N
Referred by: Word of Mouth
From: the CYBERSTREAM
Time: 1997-12-01 00:30:00
Comments: To my friend, Janet, the most prolific of us all ... thanks for the invite, and all success with cc&d and all. - PbN


entry
by: r london
02/08/00 11:22 am EST

R. London
Referred by: Just Surfed On In!
From: New York City
Time: 1997-12-01 23:26:00


Comments: Around and around/ astride him, behind a toothy grimace/ gold filigree, hard wood/ and brass/ Merry go 'round once in a year/ this time in hours, only twenty three/ the ring's lost/ only a shimmering illusion I thought was meant for me.


"Long Long Road"
by: Vin Gleason
02/08/00 11:20 am EST

Vin Gleason

Website: Insane Poetry
Referred by: Just Surfed On In
From: New York
Time: 1998-03-18 08:07:00
Comments: I figured Since I put your poems on the web I would send you one of my own

"Long Long Road"

Life is a long, long road
With a curving path it sends
lover afer lover
and most important friends
Tis days spent off that road
With hopefully more spent in the right lane
Constantly veering hardships and depressions
Which can surely drive the clearest minded insane?
The nights may get long and cold
With a fringe of wintery chill
But eventually spring blooms in new
Which for hardtimes becomes a remedic pill
Eventually we all come to a dead end
but find an answer to pave the way
Which eventually plants us flowers
and brings yet another beautiful day
So when this road becomes bumpy
and you find no shelter to shutter in
Think of life and this poem
And a bright new day will begin!
Copyright 1994-1998 Vin Gleason Jr.
all rights reserved spiderweb publishing 1998
I dedicate this poem to all my friends that have sat with me and a bottle of vodka through constant heartbreak


i'm always the one
by: mackenzie silver
slam4silver@aol.com
02/08/00 11:19 am EST

Mackenzie Silver
Referred by: Just Surfed On In
Time: 1998-04-09 00:28:00
Comments: i'm always the one


i'm always the one
who has to
pick up the pieces

all i've done
is wipe your noses
and clean your rooms

and now i have to
clean up my life
and i have
no one to help me


infallible
by: helena wolfe
sydneyhelena@aol.com
02/08/00 11:18 am EST

Referred by: Just Surfed On In
Time: 1998-04-09 00:30:00
Comments: infallible

i used to think that i would like to get into an accident
to be injured, to see who would care about me: to see who
would feel bad for not paying me any attention. now i

think that if i were to be injured, that a few of you
would revel in it, that a few of you would like to spoon-
feed me, to take care of me, just to be able to prove
to yourselves that i'm not infallible. but sooner or later
you'd get bored with it, you'd need someone to take
care of you again, and i'd be cast aside. so i'm never going
to give you that chance, i'm never going to let my
guard down, not even once, no matter how much i may
need help from any one of you, because none of you
are willing to think that i'm human and have real needs


1998-04-12 03:45:00
by: SJRivera
02/08/00 11:17 am EST

: SJRivera
Website: Los Hijos de Nadie
Referred by: Word of Mouth
From: Denver
Time: 1998-04-12 03:45:00


Comments: What up? Our poetry crew is interested in publishing with you and we would like you to check out our content. What is it? Maybe it's the dim street light over head, or a piercing silence that shatters the noise deep within the alley dumpster at 2 am? Maybe it's the rejection letter saying poetry doesn't revolve around the way a tongue changes the sound of an r during a 15 minute bus ride? Maybe it's the way a debutant steps over a blood stain on the cracked cement looking for an Asian immigrant (trying to get a piece of the apple pie) to invest in the next inner-city liquor store? Maybe it's the buzzing neon light that flickers in the pay-by-the-next-social-security check hotel room of drunken dispair? Maybe it's the sound of the pivot foot grinding against the gravel as a blacktop rainmaker turns around for his no-look-fade-away? Whatever it is, it is the sound and gossip within a small land mass with a mass amount of people and languages. Peace!


anyone good enough
by: aeon logan
02/08/00 11:16 am EST

Time: 1998-04-18 20:03:00
Comments:
anyone good enough

i used to think that i was no good
that i was worthless that i meant nothing

and then i got a good job
and then i got me a ton of money

and then i looked in the mirror
and i realized i was gorgeous

and people laughed at my jokes
and people thought i was talented and strong

and now i look around me
and i can't find anyone good enough

and i wonder if i expect too much
but i know for a fact that i deserve more


before i learned better
by: marina arturo
02/08/00 11:15 am EST

Referred by: Just Surfed On In
Time: 1998-04-18 20:04:00
Comments:
before i learned better

you'd think that the people that are most like you
are perfect for you
but if you find someone like that
and you're dating someone like that
you'll see
that they now have the same faults as you do
except their faults seem so much worse
and you want to kill them for the faults you have
and you want to crack their head open
and see their brains flowing out in the street

yeah, i know your mood swings, your hatred
your love of life and truth and fairness and art
and your anger
are all as strong as mine
but i'm still going to be hard on you
i'm still going to be hard on you
for being me
before i learned better


burn through me
by: shannon peppers
02/08/00 11:14 am EST

Referred by: Just Surfed On In
Time: 1998-04-18 20:06:00

burn through me

now that i've seen you
i don't even care
if you're with her
because now that i've seen you
i know you don't love her

and i know it for a fact
because you look at me
and burn through me
that way we did at the start

and if after so many years
we still feel that burn
imagine how many years we have
together
to feel alive


yes, it's yes
by: sydney anderson
sydneyhelena@aol.com
02/08/00 11:13 am EST

Referred by: Word of Mouth
Time: 1998-04-20 15:33:00

chances one: yes, it's yes


you asked me before
if there are only so many
loves in our lives

if there are only so
many chances
for love

and i said yes

and i know
that you think
it's because of fate
or god
or religion

but i know that
there are only
so many chances
to feel that bond

that there can only be
so many people
who perfectly fit you

who fit like a glove

who want what you want
who feel like you feel
who dream what you dream


you ask me if
there are only so many loves
and the answer is
yes
oh, yes, it's yes


here i am
by: mackenzie silver
slam4silver@aol.com
02/08/00 11:12 am EST

Referred by: Word of Mouth
Time: 1998-04-20 15:34:00

chances two: here i am


you asked me if you have
only so many loves in your life
and the asnwer is yes

and it not because of fate
or religion, or chance
but the chances are just so thin

that you can find someone
that you can love, revere, respect
someone that always keeps you guessing

and someone that makes you feel alive
just by listening to the things they
say, to the way they think

that only happens so often, you know
so i guess you do only get so many
loves, so if you need me, here i

am


can't answer that one
by: helena wolfe
sydneyhelena@aol.com
02/08/00 11:10 am EST

Referred by: Word of Mouth
Time: 1998-04-20 15:37:00

can't answer that one

i have a better job than you
i have more talent than you
i've made more money than you

i'm attractive
i'm funny
i'm kind

i'm strong
i'm intelligent
i'm beautiful

and i look at what we had
and i wonder why i ever tried
and why i ever bothered

why did i ever put up with you
why did i think i needed you
why did i let you make me unhappy

with all my talent, with all my
brains
i still can't answer that one


choices
by: marina arturo
02/08/00 11:10 am EST

1998-04-20 15:37:00

choices

don't hate yourself
for the choices you've made
just make the right choices


shiny new again
by: gabriel athens
gathens@aol.com
02/08/00 11:08 am EST

Referred by: Word of Mouth
Time: 1998-04-20 15:41:00

shiny new again

i've always been by your side

i've always tried to help you
when something was wrong

i've always picked up the pieces

and i've seen you fall apart
and i've seen it happen to others, too

and i've picked up the pieces
glued them back together
til they were shiny new again

and now i feel like it's happening
to me and who is here for me

you're falling apart too how
are you supposed to help me


cafe society
by: Sara Russell
02/08/00 11:07 am EST

Website: CAFE SOCIETY
Referred by: NewsGroups
From: Merrie England
Time: 1998-05-07 23:43:00
Comments: WEBWORLD
Copyright Sara L. Russell/aka Pinky Andrexa/31/3/98.

Voices in the machinery
lost souls suspended in the astral plane
and you so far away from me
between the lines, unseen, my untyped pain

between the words that replace your face
my little sister, far away
my web is my trap and my hiding place
and we still have so much more to say.

My virtual family and I
talk Stateside, Britside, cheap rate, peak,
and the line won't drop and I won't cry
until, maybe, the next time after we speak.


poetry one!
by: Grover Gall
02/08/00 11:06 am EST

Grover Gall
Website: Poetry One!
Referred by: Advertisment/Brochure
From: London ON CA
Time: 1998-05-19 21:17:00

Against The Grain

the sharpest sliver
finds its way easily
--deep into innocent flesh
which presses only subtly
against it
--through ignorance
--through chance.


TOO MUCH, TOO MANY
by: William Bough
02/08/00 11:05 am EST

William Bough
Website: Poetry From the Edge
Referred by: Net Search
From: Liverpool, England
Time: 1998-05-22 15:12:00
Comments: TOO MUCH, TOO MANY

Too much sadness, Too much badness, Sadness and badness lead to madness. Too much awfulness, Too much atrociousness, Awfulness and atrociousness lead to anxiousness. Too much bitterness, Too much aggressiveness, Bitterness and aggressiveness lead to callousness. Too much aimlessness, Too much curiousness, Aimlessness and curiousness lead to addictiveness. Too much abruptness, Too much abrasiveness, Abruptness and abrasiveness lead to abusiveness. Too many causeless, So much selfishness, Causeless and selfishness lead to hopelessness.

By William Bough.


the purple heart
by: William Cass
02/08/00 11:04 am EST

Referred by: Just Surfed On In
From: Seattle, WA
Time: 1998-05-26 19:32:00

Comments: THE PURPLE HEART At the bottom of the beautiful laden sea, lies the grave of someone I knew, but never met. He lived his life as a sailor, but he died as a savior. The ones he left behind will always remember his passing, he received a blessing, that should be in red, not in purple. The red would stand for the blood split to receive it, the gold figurehead stands for the First Commander who gave it. The colors that hold it stand for the Glorious Country that cries each time it is given. On the back of the medal the names are scrolled to remember those who received it. The shape is in that of a heart to show where the true idea of giving it came from. The purple and gold are in memory of where you may be now, and where we someday may join you.

By William Scott Cass in loving memory of William Stephen Cass


1998-07-04 04:10:00
by: diana 02/08/00 11:02 am EST

Diana
Website: DLB's Retirement Home
Referred by: Just Surfed On In
From: PA

Comments: I'm enjoying your page so very much
you seem to have a special touch.
So much here to see and do,
I would like to thank you!
Now I hope you'll pardon my lack of rhyme,
and stop in to see me again sometime.


Nick DiSpoldo, Small Press Review (on "Children, Churches and Daddies," April 1997)

Kuypers is the widely-published poet of particular perspectives and not a little existential rage, but she does not impose her personal or artistic agenda on her magazine. CC+D is a provocative potpourri of news stories, poetry, humor, art and the "dirty underwear" of politics.
One piece in this issue is "Crazy," an interview Kuypers conducted with "Madeline," a murderess who was found insane, and is confined to West Virginia's Arronsville Correctional Center. Madeline, whose elevator definitely doesn't go to the top, killed her boyfriend during sex with an ice pick and a chef's knife, far surpassing the butchery of Elena Bobbitt. Madeline, herself covered with blood, sat beside her lover's remains for three days, talking to herself, and that is how the police found her. For effect, Kuypers publishes Madeline's monologue in different-sized type, and the result is something between a sense of Dali's surrealism and Kafka-like craziness.
..
Children, Churches and Daddies is eclectic, alive and is as contemporary as tomorrow's news.


Jason Pettus, freelance writer (review of John Sweet chapbook, published by Scars Publications)

"Circling Overhead," by John Sweet. 24 pp. Jesus Christ -- this could easily qualify as the most depressing chapbook I've ever fuckin' read. From the chuckling opener, "Dying in America" ("the sun pinning your limbs to the pavement as the tourists... take pictures for their friends") to the rib-tickling closer, "Murdered Children" ("I write about murdered children simply because children are murdered... there's no point in praying because there's no god"), "Circling Overhead" is page after page of venom-filled, America-hating, piss-laced ruminations on battered wives, children with guns, and lynched minority groups (and, of course, the required "I hate myself because I'm a straight white male" piece). ...Oh, it's GOOD, don't get me wrong, it's definitely worth your time and money. And of course, Scars Publications' attention to graphic design makes it, as usual, a sharp book to even look at. But for God's sake, will someone out there please have sex with Mr. Sweet so he'll get in a better mood? Oh, wait, he did have sex ("Not Love But Something") and it still didn't help. Uh, never mind.


Ed Hamilton, writer

#85 (of children, churches and daddies) turned out well. I really enjoyed the humor section, especially the test score answers. And, the cup-holder story is hilarious. I'm not a big fan of poetry - since much of it is so hard to decipher - but I was impressed by the work here, which tends toward the straightforward and unpretentious.
As for the fiction, the piece by Anderson is quite perceptive: I liked the way the self-deluding situation of the character is gradually, subtly revealed. (Kuypers') story is good too: the way it switches narrative perspective via the letter device is a nice touch.


Jim Maddocks, GLASGOW, via the Internet

I'll be totally honest, of the material in Issue (either 83 or 86 of Children, Churches and Daddies) the only ones I really took to were Kuypers'. TRYING was so simple but most truths are, aren't they?


C Ra McGuirt, Editor, The Penny Dreadful Review (on Children, Churches and Daddies)

CC&D is obviously a labor of love ... I just have to smile when I go through it. (Janet Kuypers) uses her space and her poets to best effect, and the illos attest to her skill as a graphic artist.
"I really like ("Writing Your Name"). It's one of those kind of things where your eye isn't exactly pulled along, but falls effortlessly down the poem.
I liked "knowledge" for its mix of disgust and acceptance. Janet Kuypers does good little movies, by which I mean her stuff provokes moving imagery for me. Color, no dialogue; the voice of the poem is the narrator over the film.


Debra Purdy Kong, writer, British Columbia, Canada (on the magazine "Children, Churches and Daddies")

I like the magazine a lot. I like the spacious lay-out and the different coloured pages and the variety of writer's styles. Too many literary magazines read as if everyone graduated from the same course. We need to collect more voices like these and send them everywhere.


Mark Blickley, writer

The precursor to the magazine title (Children, Churches and Daddies) is very moving. "Scars" is also an excellent prose poem. I never really thought about scars as being a form of nostalgia. But in the poem it also represents courage and warmth. I look forward to finishing her book.


Gary, Editor, The Road Out of Town (on the Children, Churches and Daddies Web Site)

I just checked out the site. It looks great. I especially love the "info" page.


John Sweet, writer (on chapbook designs)

Visuals were awesome. They've got a nice enigmatic quality to them. Front cover reminds me of the Roman sculptures of angels from way back when. Loved the staggered tire lettering, too. Way cool.
(on "Hope Chest in the Attic")
Some excellent writing in "Hope Chest in the Attic." I thought "Children, Churches and Daddies" and "The Room of the Rape" were particularly powerful pieces.


Cheryl Townsend, Editor, Impetus (on Children, Churches and Daddies)

The new CC&D looks absolutely amazing. It's a wonderful lay-out, looks really professional - all you need is the glossy pages. Truly impressive AND the calendar, too. Can't wait to actually start reading all the stuff inside.. Wanted to just say, it looks good so far!!!


Brian B. Braddock, Writer (on 1996 Children, Churches and Daddies)

I passed on a copy to my brother who is the director of the St. Camillus AIDS programs. We found (Children, Churches and Daddies') obvious dedication along this line admirable.


Paul Weinman, Writer (on 1996 Children, Churches and Daddies)

Wonderful new direction (Children, Churches and Daddies has) taken - great articles, etc. (especially those on AIDS). Great stories - all sorts of hot info!


Fred Whitehead, Editor, Freethought History

This "Blue Note" poem instantly haunted me because of its gritty realism, and its deceptive "simplicity" (consider further what this guy's "religion" really is...and how "universal" it may be out there).
"Hope Chest in the Attic: A Collection of Thirteen Years of Poetry, Prose and Art Work"... (has) a remarkable preface defending concreteness in writing, and concludes: "I just want you to feel like you have been sucked in by this work, that hands have come ripping out from the very fibers of the page itself and taken a stranglehold on you. That you've just lived it all." The poems themselves deal with harsh, even terrifying topics of rape, abuse, family turmoil, alcoholism and depression. Janet Kuypers has not only written poetry about this, but has volunteered for campus rape education activities, including rallies, etc. One poem, "children, churches and daddies," relates how the poet attended a wedding in central Illinois; when the children go to the altar for communion, "little soldiers in a little line," she stays seated, making clear that religious belief is not an option for her. It's easy, isn't it, to just get up and go and pretend acceptance; sometimes doing nothing is courageous.
The poet's next book was "The Window"; in this collection, she writes on "a wider variety of issues, from childhood to death, from love to separation, from family to loneliness, from wealth to homelessness." There's some powerful writing about insane prisoners here, really tough and difficult to read, but at the same time, it is all real. In this volume, there is a substantial amount of prose, but also poetry and striking original art work based on computer images. "Christmas Eve" recounts taking a left-over meal to homeless men on the street: "and all i could think of/was these two men/eating pasta with their fingers/on Christmas Eve." Also pertinent is "St. Anthony's Medallion," told in the voice of a father who takes his son to a cemetary where his mother was buried a month before. Lightning strikes the boy dead: "It is believed a St. Anthony medallion worn around his neck acted as a conductor."
Janet Kuypers was born on 1970, so she is only 26 years old, with two fine collections of work, and a third one, "Close Cover Before Striking," underway. She has been published over 600 times, so by any standard she must bew considered a prolific writer. She resolutely tells the truth about the lives of people in contemporary America, shorn of glitter and evasion and deceit. I admire her vigor and her purpose, and especially how she accomplishes all this with freshness of vision. Discarding illusions without mercy, she's one of the bravest new voices on the scene today.

It seems to me that (Kuypers) takes the confessional kind of poetry beyond its limits, beyond the individual, or rather through her to the problems. Indeed, the agonies of a whole society in chaos. All this mayhem erupts in private homes, but has its roots in our betrayal of community, in our forgetting ethics, in our brutality toward the weak. Her people are hurting under the glitter and gloss of consumer society, and while the Market thrives, they are broken on its wheels. Can poetry contribute to the solution to all this? I think so, but the results are unproven so far, in part because of this confusion and pain. But being with the outcast is that essential first step. Melville's Ahab cries out, "If man would strike, strike through the mask!" In our time, she has struck through the mask also.


tom (armoredstar@angelfire.com):

So now I look for your stuff and I know it's not boring...I'm sure you have many fans, although most probably don't take time to let you know.


Janet Kuypers:
LOOKING THROUGH THEIR WINDOWS

Scars Publications
20 pp.
I like Janet Kuypers' poems, even if she occasionally dwells on the emotional consequences of death and pan too much. Even so, for a poet under 30, her mastery of the simple word is exceptional. Too many poets, when they attempt a change of persona (especially in the first person voice), the result is often flat, unbelievable, too forced. Not so with Kuypers. In the poem "Private Lives III, the elevated train", she takes us for a ride with morning commute yuppies on a crowded train to work. Suddenly the poet's disgust for these middle-class workers surfaces; when she observes a woman decked out in a full-length fur coat, her reaction becomes the urge to spill coffee on the woman. "I'll bet they don't even know what the animals they killed for this looked like," she writes. Most of the other poems here are good, though Kuypers' emotionality can become intense, if not bewildering.--Kurt Nimmo



A. Jacob Hassler, via the internet

I visit the Poetry Exchange nearly every day. While several talented poets are featured therein, I personally enjoy (Kuypers') writings especially. I admire the pummeling truths about your subjects. Only real-life experiences could draw those analogies!


Amy, via the Internet (about the writing of Janet Kuypers)

I found myself drawn into your "story" and, despite my crabby mood, I read it till the end. You conveyed the circular nature of life quite well; also the sense of resignation and fatalism of the narrator.


Angela Uptmor-Herrera, from the internet

I want to praise (Kuypers') essay on pornography. It is wonderful to know that there are intelligent young women out there that "cannot be submissive" either, and are not!!! Keep up your inspiring work; I intend to become an avid fan.


Anthony Boyd, Editor, Whisper Magazine

(Kuypers') writing is well-done and she successfully avoids cliches and other lame things.


Aron Trauring

(Kuypers' work is) very nice. Being afrequent flyer, I especially appreciated the toilet on airplane story (on an airplane with a frequent flyer). And I liked her veggie story (some people want to believe) too (being a veggie, and hating people who can't face the truth).


B. Jan Pearce, writer

I feel not only honored to have read (Kuypers') poetry, but as if I were looking into a mirror. We have relished the same music, experienced the same feelings, loved the same men. But then - that's the way it is supposed to be, isn't it - The poet making others feel as if we have survived the same pains and joys. I have been a writer/poet my entire life, probably much like Kuypers in that I never really had a choice about the matter. It is just something we must do; something we are called on to provide in this sometimes callous world of ours to make people "feel" and thereby learn from the emotion. Thank you for sharing it with the world!


BAST Media (on "Hope Chest in the Attic")

Cool look... in an alternative style and voice. Reads like a labor of love, most meaningful to those close to the author yet reaches any reader with observations and comments on various situations. Definitely worth reading.


Ben Ohmart, Writer (on 1996 Childrren, Churches and Daddies)

Just wanted to say the new look of the magazine looks Wonderful! Good job on the ezine too. I'm impressed.
I'm currently reading the great book ("Close Cover Before Striking"). It's fantastic. Best $10 I've ever spent.


Bob Z, Panic Button Press, Sacramento CA

I don't usually like poetry. But I found (Ms. Kuypers') style interesting, liked the images in "wedding lost" and the believability of "farmer" - I get the feeling she knows her subjects well, and has a lot to say. I don't mind use of words like "and" and "the" because they seem to be important anyway. She writes with strong feeling and passion, inspired dropper of verbal bombs.


Brian B. Braddock, Writer (on 1996 Children, Churches and Daddies)

I passed on a copy to my brother who is the director of the St. Camillus AIDS programs. We found (Children, Churches and Daddies') obvious dedication along this line admirable.


Brian Selerski, from the internet (on "i want love")

I read (Kuypers') poem "i want love" and found that I could relate to the feelings that she expressed. She made the poem so simple, but complex in text meaning that it is simply worded but it has a lot of meaning and feeling behind it.


C Ra McGuirt, Editor, The Penny Dreadful Review (on Children, Churches and Daddies)

CC&D is obviously a labor of love ... I just have to smile when I go through it. (Janet Kuypers) uses her space and her poets to best effect, and the illos attest to her skill as a graphic artist.


"I really like ("Writing Your Name"). It's one of those kind of things where your eye isn't exactly pulled along, but falls effortlessly down the poem.


I liked "knowledge" for its mix of disgust and acceptance. Janet Kuypers does good little movies, by which I mean her stuff provokes moving imagery for me. Color, no dialogue; the voice of the poem is the narrator over the film.


Carlton Press, New York, NY (on "Hope Chest in the Attic")

HOPE CHEST IN THE ATTIC is a collection of well-fashioned, often elegant poems and short prose that deals in many instances, with the most mysterious and awesome of human experiences: love... Janet Kuypers draws from a vast range of experiences and transforms thoughts into lyrical and succinct verse... Recommended as poetic fare that will titillate the palate in its imagery and imaginative creations.


Cheryl A. Townsend, editor, Impetus (on the book "(woman.)")

Janet takes hold of everyday stereotypes, shakes them up, and throws them at your feet. She makes you look at the vile mess we have all helped to create and exist. "This is not a pretty picture" is quite intent in describing (woman.). Broken into appropriate chapters...for men & for women, Janet pokes your own pointing finger in your own eye. Blink again and look at the absurd labeling and phrases taken to task. She gives voice to a woman convicted of killing her boyfriend during a rape, chopping his body up and then being sentenced to an asylum. This story belongs in "WOMEN OF THE ASYLUM" as it is every bit as intensifying as those within that book's pages. (woman.) is poetry relating to date rape, domestic violence, emotional abuse and recovery. I applaud Janet her stand and I will gladly stand beside her.


Cheryl Townsend, Editor, Impetus (on Children, Churches and Daddies)

The new CC&D looks absolutely amazing. It's a wonderful lay-out, looks really professional - all you need is the glossy pages. Truly impressive AND the calendar, too. Can't wait to actually start reading all the stuff inside.. Wanted to just say, it looks good so far!!!


Chris McKinnon (on collection book "Blister and Burn")

Thank you - (Kuypers has) really outdone herself with Blister and Burn. What a great volume, and your work is quite compelling! Marvelous job.


Chris W., Editor, Cat Machine

We loved Kuypers' stuff. We didn't get around to reading a lot of our submissions until the very last minute, but when we got to hers, we kind of forgot about the time pressures and everything.
Christopher Herdt, Editor, Osric Publishing

I enjoyed a great many... (pieces of Kuypers' work). Let me just say that I like (Kuypers') work, and am extremely pleased to include her with the other authors in White Crow.


Christopher Scott, Editor, Poetry In Progress

I must admit, her pieces were quite moving to both myself and my staff. A few had to stop reading because they were too overcome with emotion. (Kuypers should) give herself a pat on the back for that one.


Chuck Taylor, Writer

I liked the one about the broken shouldered dad shoot the squirrel ("My Father, Shooting an Animal"). She did it right, and avoided too much politically correct moralizing.


Craig C. Russel, Editor, The Owen Wister Review

I had never heard of (Janet Kuypers) or her magazine, but suffice it to say, (after reading some of her work) I now want to read everything she has ever written.


Kuypers' work sent a chill down my spine (that's a good thing) and it is easily the best poetry I have read since I started my stint as poetry editor there.


Craig Vitter, Editor, @EZine

I'm impressed by (Kuypers') prolific work, she obviously is very devoted to her writing.


D. V. Aldrich, Writer

I just recieved my copy of the vol. 77 - March issue. First of all, let me say I am impressed, make that "throw me up against the wall and do whatever you want with me" impressed, by the new layout, design and color. Mighty fine job, mighty fine!


Dan Landrum, Editor, Taggerzine

I feel I'm going to be swallowed up in (her) openness... Her honesty wakes me. I'll stop claiming, stop possessing my pain as real - I'll share it with her. (She makes) me examine my humility, the humiliation of being raped and I will no longer feel alone.

I will thank her for rekindling the reminders of the mysteries of this paradoxical adventure we call day-to-day living. I will thank her for sharing her hopes, dreams, and joys along with the pain and confusion.

I admire her courage, her self-honesty, her integrity in putting so much of herself into her work, into her art.

My sense is that Kuypers) has a strong, articulate voice and makes insightful observations into the human/huwoman conditions.
Dan Landrum, Editor, Taggerzine (on "Rape Education" poems)

Those pieces for me have a personal-social realism that is very poignant, very powerful (and unfortunately, seemingly timeless).


Daniel Crocker, Editor, Window Panes

CCD is a great magazine. Very nicely done - and good poetry.


David Gold, editor, Probable Cause

I really like (Kuypers' work). Usually, poetry depresses me so much my other editors grab them from me before I can read them or I will be miserable the rest of the day. But... I enjoyed her work.


Debra Purdy Kong, writer, British Columbia, Canada (on the magazine "Children, Churches and Daddies")

I like the magazine a lot. I like the spacious lay-out and the different coloured pages and the variety of writer's styles. Too many literary magazines read as if everyone graduated from the same course. We need to collect more voices like these and send them everywhere.


Deckard Kinder, via the internet

read (Kuypers') stuff in the Poetry Exchange... nice... Best i've seen on the Poetry Exchange ... Some of it reminded me of how I felt/what I wrote when my 2nd ex split... Congrats, anyone who can elicit feelings thru writing is doing the job...


Donna Thompson, editor, Challenges Magazine (on "Blister and Burn")

Blister and Burn arrived today. It's quite handsome, attractive format, clean and uncluttered Congratulations on the publication....good work!


Donnie R. Strickland (Rainthief@aol.com), from the Internet

I took a little time and visited some of the writing. I like "the burning" very much. I like the narrative feel of the piece. I like one-sided conversational pieces in poetry ... like you don't care what the reader thinks; you're just reporting your rhetorical thoughts and observations.


Dorrance Publishing Co., Pittsburgh, PA (on "Hope Chest in the Attic")

"Hope Chest in the Attic" captures the complexity of human nature and reveals startling yet profound discernments about the travesties that surge through the course of life. This collection of poetry, prose and artwork reflects sensitivity toward feminist issues concerning abuse, sexism and equality. It also probes the emotional torrent that people may experience as a reaction to the delicate topics of death, love and family.
"Chain Smoking" depicts the emotional distress that afflicted a friend while he struggled to clarify his sexual ambiguity. Not only does this thought-provoking profile address the plight that homosexuals face in a homophobic society, it also characterizes the essence of friendship.
"The room of the rape" is a passionate representation of the suffering rape victims experience. Vivid descriptions, rich symbolism, and candid expressions paint a shocking portrait of victory over the gripping fear that consumes the soul after a painful exploitation.


Doug Carroll, editor, Idiot Wind magazine (on "some people want to believe")

I found the material to be entertaining and, at times, thought-provoking.
I found ("some people want to believe") to be amusing.


Dusty Dog Reviews, CA (on "Dysfunctional Family Greeting Cards")

Ms. Kuypers shows us that, in certain circumstances, each person is an enormously authoritative reality to each other person...Ms. Kuypers is adept at creating an emotional layering.


Dusty Dog Reviews, CA (on "knife")

These poems document a very complicated internal response to the feminine side of social existence.
She gives us an intimate peek into the incarcerated existence of a woman who killed her boyfriend/rapist ("crazy") and who was pronounced insane because of it. This tale displays such revelations into the inmate's mind that I tend to believe it.
And as the book proceeds the poems become increasingly psychologically complex and, ultimately, fascinating and genuinely rewarding.


Dusty Dog Reviews (on the chapbook "Right There, By Your Heart")

The whole project is hip, anti-academic, the poetry of reluctant grown-ups, picking noses in church. An enjoyable romp! Though also serious.


Dusty Dog Reviews (on "Without You")

She open with a poem of her own devising, which has that wintry atmosphere demonstrated in the movie version of Boris Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago. The atmosphere of wintry white and cold, gloriously murderous cold, stark raging cold, numbing and brutalizing cold, appears almost as a character who announces to his audience, "Wisdom occurs only after a laboriously magnificent disappointment." Alas, that our Dusty Dog for mat cannot do justice to Ms. Kuypers' very personal layering of her poem across the page.


Dylan D. Skola, via the internet

I really love (Kuypers') poems and can relate to everything she says. I am suprised by this. I wish I could read all of her poems. it's like listening to myself. It is what I am thinking but try not to think about or admit.


Ed Hamilton, writer

#85 (of children, churches and daddies) turned out well. I really enjoyed the humor section, especially the test score answers. And, the cup-holder story is hilarious. I'm not a big fan of poetry - since much of it is so hard to decipher - but I was impressed by the work here, which tends toward the straightforward and unpretentious.
As for the fiction, the piece by Anderson is quite perceptive: I liked the way the self-deluding situation of the character is gradually, subtly revealed. (Kuypers') story is good too: the way it switches narrative perspective via the letter device is a nice touch.


Ellen Shull, Editor, Palo Alto Review

I forwarded (poem "everything was alive and dying") to all of the readers. They all say it has power and persuasion.


Elwargo@aol.com

I read your poem regarding your first brush with death, and it happened to be Lennon's, one which, no matter how many times we have faced it, was horrible. I like the way you wrote about it. The way it effected you. Your ending was on the whole superb...it put it all together...wonderful job !!

I thought Lennon's was your first until I read the next poem, how intense, how masked the death of that woman was, no one spoke of it! As if it was unspeakable, so sad is the way of the world in respect to what we feel and what we say we feel, or dont say....


Ernest Slyman, editor, Reverie

Love (Kuypers') work. Enjoy her style, graceful, charming and engaging work. I love her work. And wish to show our other contributors her style and lavish textured charm.


Ernest Slyman

I write to say I enjoyed (Kuypers') poem Father's Tears. Very nice. And thanks for writing the poem. It shines bright, lovely. You write sentences that mean business. You write what you understand. I admire your work. I commend you. No extrovert are you. Rather you go about tidying up the world. This and that applied with much charm grace.


Fithian Press, Santa Barbara, CA (on "Hope Chest in the Attic")

Indeed, there's a healthy balance here between wit and dark vision, romance and reality, just as there's a good balance between words and graphics. The work shows brave self-exploration, and serves as a reminder of mortality and the fragile beauty of friendship.


Fred Whitehead, Editor, Freethought History (on "(woman.)")

Janet Kuypers has gazed into this Hell (of sexism), and is determined to preserve and transmit the lived record of its regions so that, perhaps, others can avoid pain and suffering. She insists that we resolutely examine the roots of our society's obsession with owning and buying and shaping and dominating, which much of the time is men ruling women. I often feel as if she is attempting, in her work, to exorcise the demons that grip America in the name of freedom and "family values."
The style of writing here is direct, honest and searching, but also illuminating. We anticipate that something bad is going to happen in the narrative, but we never know exactly what in advance. But that's not all. Sometimes a woman will find her way out to freedom, to love. Or there might be a revelation, as when a guy gets a cigarette put out on the back of his hand. This is a message, a warning, that there will be resistance.
The truth isn't always pretty. What we have done to women isn't pretty. The paradox is that women are socialized to make themselves as "pretty" as possible, according to the false standards of male fantasies. I'm especially impressed by Janet's designed texts, which demonstrate in graphic form how women are viewed in our culture. Pay attention to the language, to the images, and we can see. Yes, we can all see.

Blister and Burn (is a) collection the admitably fulfills the promise of its title. I'm amazed at how much (Kuypers) accomplishes and gets done. She is listening hard for the authentic voices of America.


Gary, Editor, The Road Out of Town

I like (Kuypers') poetry. So much poetry being written now is existential angst. I like the sort of poetry that paints a picture in your head and you feel like you are there - physically or emotionally - for just a second.

I just checked out the site. It looks great. I especially love the "info" page.


Gerard Kusiolek (on "right there by your heart")

Just read "right there by your heart". Real power there. Don't know what she was feeling when she wrote it, but by the time I was done I was twisted in a knot.


Gordon Woodruff (about Nation interview with Janet Kuypers)

I read (Kuypers') interview, and it is my opinion that she is very inspiring. Not too long ago, I was caught in a situation that caused me to fall a little under the weather. Someone said that my horoscope said that an older woman would help me get through it. Naturally, I thought I would end up developing a relationship with an older woman, but I was wrong. It wasn't supposed to be taken at face value. You see, I read her interview in Nation and, probably for the first time ever, realized that everything would be okay. So, in essence, she is the older woman that helped me pull through my trying times. Just wanted to say "thanks" and that "she is a great inspiration to many."


Guy, Editor, Hipnosis Magazine (on the writing of Janet Kuypers)

I loved (Kuypers') work.....Its so refreshing....so many pieces I receive to look at are so formatted and such, and hers is so rich and from the soul.... I especially loved the one (some people want to believe) about being vegetarian (I'm an ovo-lacto also) - this is a conversation I had with someone as well.....very enlightening to know that others suffer my fate.... I really loved them all....


Jane B. Roth, writer (on Slate and Marrow)

...Absolutely beautiful. Very impressive. Congratulations. Haven't had a chance to read much yet, but I loved the poem "Clipping Koltin." The photography looks great.


Jane Butkin Roth, writer (on 1997 Poetry Wall Calendar)

The poetry calendars arrived today. They look terrific. I loved Crossing the Street, The Burning, and The Year I Reach My Prime. Interesting photos, too. Congratulations on the results of (Kuypers') efforts in producing a beautiful calendar.


It's the strange result of reading confessional work of someone you don't know and who isn't famous enough to have all their skeletons hanging in full public view (i.e. Anne Sexton). I should reiterate, I LIKE that. The effect is a very engaging one.


Jeff Morris, writer

I would like to congratulate Kuypers on the material she has in Vivo. I would like to congratulate her because its not crap. I looked through poetry and fiction on the net for 2.5 hours and hers is the first I've found that isn't crap. Her work is very very good. It is fair and intelligent and interesting and I can tell she wrote it because she had something to write — not because she wanted to write something.
I thank her for preventing this evening from being a complete waste of time for me. I was beginning to wonder if it was me. It wasn't.


Jerin Stanlake, Writer, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada (on the writing of Janet Kuypers and the Internet Site)

Wow! She kicks!! Right on!! I just got this 'ere Internet thingie up and running this week and I been checking out the net for a place to drop my poetry...I wanna make sure I don't waste my time with a poetry server who ain't gonna bother with me....anyways, I was reading The Burning first, then This Is What It Means... and a couple more including The Letter, and I was really impressed, finally someone who actually got personally involved in their poetry, not standing back like some "Frasier Sitcom" intellectual type....you know what I mean? I mean you get into (Kuypers') stuff, you FEEL it...obviously I really like poetry, the more powerful and intense the better...and I think I'm sitting on a g-damn nuclear bomb...


Jessica Riendeau, writer, (on interview with Janet Kuypers from Nation magazine)

I did recieve my copy of Nation on Saturday morning and it was an interesting mix of feelings evoked upon seeing something of mine actually in print. I think that Janet Kuypers is a new hero of mine...


Jesus Trejo, writer (on the writing of Janet Kuypers)

Whats an amateur poet like myself doing commeting on the work of a big timer poet? And a female one too? Though i am sure she has probably heard it a million times before and at this point it probably makes no difference... (Kuypers') poetry is excellent, great, with an aftertaste of self-questioning. All I can hope for is for her to keep on entertaining and amusing with her words the ears of poetry lovers and amateur poets as myself.


Jim Cohn, Editor, Napalm Health Spa

I was moved by the powerful sense of detail with which (Janet Kuypers) expresses her memories. Her work is excellent and should be seen.


Jim Maddocks, GLASGOW, via the Internet

I'll be totally honest, of the material in Issue (either 83 or 86 of Children, Churches and Daddies) the only ones I really took to were Kuypers'. TRYING was so simple but most truths are, aren't they?

When I first read CHICAGO, WEST SIDE I wasn't that crazy about it. It was only on closer investigation that it began to grow on me. It is evocative. Actually it was one word that changed my mind about the whole piece: this! as in "this time, when she heard the sirens..." So, did she kill her abusive husband? Whatever she did, it seems she was still able to make a cup of coffee after, such a domesticated thing to do. In fact, the whole opening image is quite excellent, very well constructed. So how many times have the neighbours called the cops?


Joe Peebles, Editor, Diarist's Journal

(Kuypers' work) is great writing, and she writes extremely well...She is a great writer. Keep up the good work...Diarist's Journal can certainly use people with her talent.


Joe Speer, Editor, Speer Presents

I value her words as they appear on the screen or on paper. Anyway, I'm one of her biggest fans.

(Kuypers is) one of my favorite writers.

Her words create scars on my memory.

When I read a full page of Chicago's soon-to-be award-winning-poet Janet Kuypers' work I had one of Joyce's moments of aesthetic arrest (not yet cardiac, huh?).


John Dolan, Deep South

I think (Kuypers is) an amazing writer. Herwork is so straight, and that's so rare...how'd she get so brave?


John Freudeman, editor, Georgian Blue Poetry Society

Just read "Childhood Memories six" on the Poetry Exchange. It struck a very responsive chord. Well put together - congratulations!


(on "Hope Chest in the Attic")

Some excellent writing in "Hope Chest in the Attic." I thought "Children, Churches and Daddies" and "The Room of the Rape" were particularly powerful pieces.


Joseph Speer, Editor, Speer Presents

I hope to meet editor Janet Kuypers... I will tell her: "the thought of you/puts a sparkle in my eye/and I can't help but smile." When I discover a Kuypers poem in any zine I turn on to that page and read it first.


Joyce Carbone, editor, Cer*ber*us

But especially, I like (Kuypers') ability for versatility. She had the rage, the tenderness, the humor.


Katherine, London, Ontario, Canada, via the Internet (on "knowledge")

I just read (Kuypers') piece of work, and i have to say that it blew me away. Did that experience in the gas station actually happen? What an awakening. I never understood when men argued that the women in the porn mags "wanted" to be there. As if they even look at their faces, searching for a smile! I've often found myself having to use a gas station bathroom on the side of the highway, or in a dingy town with a population of what seemed like two serial killers and a shit load of perverts. I've never wanted to touch a thing in them, afraid that I would then take more of the memory of the place back with me to the car, contaminating it.


Kenny Wright, Editor, Darkwave Society

I think (Kuypers is) a very talented writer.

I really enjoy having her poetry in the magazine. I think she is a very talented writer.


Len Edgerly, from the Internet

Just read (Kuypers') poem about pain and it made me grateful everything's working this morning in my lucky body. Good writing.


Lindsay (BOSTONGAL9@AOL.COM), from the internet (on "Looking for a Worthy Adversary")

This was by far the best poem I have ever read! I mean that seriously. I have never been able to read someone's work and truly feel as though I was there. This was so powerful...so moving....I really enjoyed it.


Lionel Bernard, Washington D.C.

(Kuypers') poems are a treat to read.
I read (I Remember) twice and I must say that it was quite moving.
What I like about her writing is that it is very personal and she writes as though you were holding a conversation. Keep up the good work!


Mark Blickley, writer

The precursor to the magazine title (Children, Churches and Daddies) is very moving. "Scars" is also an excellent prose poem. I never really thought about scars as being a form of nostalgia. But in the poem it also represents courage and warmth. I look forward to finishing her book.


Mark Davis, Editor, On The Road (on the writing of Janet Kuypers)

All (Kuypers') writing is of very good quality.


Melody, via the internet

I just wanted to tell (Kuypers) I enjoyed reading her poetry! Thank you! And keep on writing!


molly (molly@opaque.net), about "changing woman":

Thank you so much for the book—beautiful beautiful beautiful! I'm keeping
it by my bed to savor slowly.


Ms. Frenette, on the internet (about the poem "Barbie")

I read (Kuypers') poem Barbie. It has so much truth to it. I'm 13. But when I was little I had barbies. All different ones. I had all the ones from the shows like Aladdin and Beauty and the Beast. And just plain old Barbie. I don't get why they make them look so perfect. I wish they could make them look like the average human being. Most people aren't that tall, most people don't have big blue eyes and long, flowing blond hair. Most people are not anorexic. Or look like it. We are all different and THAT'S what makes us beautiful! I really like your poem. It will stay in my mind forever!

Children, Churches and Daddies is eclectic, alive and is as contemporary as tomorrow's news.

Sinclair Lewis was fond of saying that college professors liked their literature "cold and dead." That seems like a safe generalization when i consider the cargoloads of vacuous vomit that spews from most university presses.

Sinclair Lewis would read Janet Kuypers. "Striking" is a collection of poetry, essays, letters and diary entries. Like Sylvia Plath, Kuypers has a sense of existential rage but, unlike Plath, her rage is more incisive and focused. She is concerned with problems, whether societal or internal, and "...the violence that often stems from them." Pablo Neruda claims "literature must have a duty toward life" and Kuypers undoubtedly believes this. "Violence" - aside from the obvious forms that fill our streets, homes, movies and television - may even be subtle. In "Taking Out The Brain," Kuypers describes a med student's first sutopsies: "I had a hard time / taking out the brain / cause you know that's where / the memories are / that's what makes him / him..."

Isolation and loneliness are recurrent Kuypers themes and, again like Plath, she is both appauled and preoccupied with suicide: suicide as the ultimate antidote for the diseases of modern society. She creates marvelous if gruesome imagery in her "Hancock Suicide, Chicago, 1994." A handicapped woman throws herself out of a fiftieth floor window of the Hancock building in Chicago and lands near a construction worker who is on a break: "...I felt all of this stuff / hit me, like wet concrete / thrown at me, but I didn't / know what the hell it was / It took a while for me / to realize the woman jumped / she hit the fence, her head / and spinal cord were still / stuck on the fence // I won't hear about this on the news / they try to downplay suicides / but other violence is fine with them."

Kuypers is clever and clear and her book is indeed a bargain.

Kuypers is a true feminist in that she demands political, economic and social equality with men. She wishes dignity, not a pedestal, and she is not one of Margaret Mitchell's blushing belles who is vulnerable to the romance of roses and rainbows.

Furthermore, she is that rare female poet who doesn't believe that poetry initially came from Hallmark cards.

I like Kuypers because she is clear, unequivocal and cleverly calculating.


Open Mic Showcase: Janet Kuypers & Jason Pettus, by Michael G. Spitz

To outsiders, the Chicago Theatre Scene might seem ubiquitous, yet inaccessible. From the larger, nationally acclaimed playhouses to the neighborhood Off-Loop troupes, you could literally see a different show every night of the year in this town, while somehow feeling oddly removed from it all. Partly, the attitude and hype might have something to do with it; mostly, though, the inevitable rigidity of the Proscenium Arch forever separates audience from actor.
Bridging this gap between performer and audience is the "Open Mic" scene, prevalent in many of the bars and coffee houses around town. From POETS and Weeds on Mondays, to Estelle's, Joy Blue and No Exit during the week, and The Green Mill poetry slams on Sundays, anyone and everyone has a chance to read and get read in front of their own peers and prolies. Providing an opportunity for published author, rising star and reg'lar Joe alike, these evenings are a way many non-non-equity Chicagoans are discovering to flap their traps.
An outstanding example of open mic mastery was Janet Kuypers and Jason Pettus' series of alternating readings at the Aloha Cafe, right off Lincoln near Montrose. Covering all the bases from Janet intercepting a call from the Founding Fathers to a lavish tale of beads and striptease in New Orleans, bouncing off Jason's revenge of his geekiness alongside the guy who said "fuck" a lot, the evening revealed just what could happen when two very talented "amateurs" get about an hour and a microphone. Sure, Janet's got four books published and a literary magazine up and running, while Jason's the proud author of "Dreaming of Laura Ingalls" and represented Chicago in the poetry nationals for 1997, but the whole point is that such evenings create an opportunity for anyone to go up there and strut their stuff.
Interestingly enough, the gay and lesbian bar and coffee house scene doesn't sport such activity, and ya can't help but wonder why. What with bingo and drag shows about the only form of audience participation around, the lack of such venues remains mysterious. Perhaps our level of self-absorption precludes the activity; perhaps we consider ourselves simply to fabulous to bother. Meanwhile, however, gays and lesbians who know better find themselves partying in different 'hoods: They've smelled the coffee, an aroma unfortunately missing from Halsted Street.
Check your local guides for Open Mics and Slams around town— Locally, let's hope the phenomena can spread to the daughters of Wilde and the sons of Woolf ...


Paul Cordeiro, writer:

just wanted to let you know that I love your poems "The Burning" and "Andrew Hettinger" very much. There is something felt there that is even greater than the journalism style poetry that you sent me, as examples, the other day. I felt that the happenings and drama described there felt like a real person speaking of real life events. Maybe it is just a quibble as the two other stories could be considered that way but somehow they felt distant.


Pete McKinley, Writer

I've read all of (Kuypers') short stories and poetry and now she is an enigma.
How can she picture herself in prison so graphically or a dual personality so realistically?
In Mexico, her work would be lcassified as 'Fantastico.' Maybe she really is a duality in reality. I'm crazy about both of her.


Peter Kowalke, editor, Nation (intro of interview with Janet Kuypers)

They originate from Chicago, but Janet Kuypers' poetry and prose can be found in little magazines across the United States.
The work is personal, with a definite message, and you can always spot a Kuypers piece without difficulty. Her "i"s are lowercasr and the words flow in a stream of consciousness. The work cries out to be heard like a lost soul at confession.
Janet Kuypers isn't a lost soul. She's an active soul, productive because her heart is anything but lost. She knows herself, can articulate herself. The words, flow, the actions are swift due to this unerring direction.
Where did Janet Kuypers come from and where will we see her next month or next year? At twenty-six, she's tackled all forms of media with success. Yet, she remains incredibly personal, accessible., More accessible, even than the individual without such accomplishments. It's a people mission, a quest to interact with the world.
More engaging than her autobiographical poetry or prose, watching Janet's life unfold is a captivating experience. Not many people out in the world are like Janet.


Peter Scott, Twisted Teen Publishing Co., Spiral Chambers

I greatly enjoyed her poetry.


R. R. Potter, wirter

I read some of (Kuypers') poetry in an e-mail anthology. Her work was outstanding.


"raf" (via the internet, on "on an airplane with a frequent flyer")

i found (Kuypers') poem hilarious...... in a good way. very observant of her.


Richard David Houff, Editor, Pariah Press/Heeltap Review

(Kuypers') poem "taking out the brain" rings true... The homeless are often viewed as mentally ill, lazy, etc. The government hype and media have done a good job impregnating the collective mindset of amerika. At any rate, that's one fine poem - send it and others of a similar nature across the planet.


Richard Fein (writer)

I have been reading many of her works, poetry, fiction, and prose all over the net and I must say I am very impressed. She is a very fine writer.


Rowan Wolf (about "phone calls from brian tolle)

A nice vignette. A slice of life.


Ryan Malone, Writer (on "Sulphur and Sawdust")

I'm enjoying the copy of "Suphur and Sawdust," which came in the mail yesterday. The design is phenomenal. Stark, sleek, brilliant, impressive. Very refreshing. The small lines of text running sideways down the pages? Very cool. This is really, well-done, classy looking anthology. Congratulations, Janet.


Sam Cucchiara, Editor, SlugFest

There is a compelling, intelligent, imaginative force in (Ms. Kuypers') voice. I think I would unequivacally say that she has the rare gift of expressing the personal as universal - which is art. She's an artist, and the world desperately needs more artists.


sdhardin@txcyber.com, from the internet

I have read some (not all, yet) of Janet's poetry and it is clear, understandable, and very moving. Thanks!


Sharon Grove (sharon.grove@cc.gte.com)

I have read through part of (Kuypers') book and it is innnnncredible. (Kuypers is) very gifted!


Stefani P., Head Editor , Dark Rooms (on Motorcycle, They called it Trust and A Life Goes By)

Another wonderful batch of work!! I truly do think (Kuypers has) talent. This was an excellent assortment.


Taproot Zine Reviews (on "Looking Through Their Windows")

I like Janet Kuypers' poems...for a poet under 30, her mastery of the simple word is exceptional. Too many poets, when they attempt a change of persona (especially in the first person voice), the result is often flat, unbelievable, too forced. Not so with Kuypers. In the poem "Private Lives III, the elevated train", she takes us for a ride with morning commute yuppies on a crowded train to work. Suddenly the poet's disgust for these middle-class workers surfaces; when she observes a woman decked out in a full-length fur coat, her reaction becomes the urge to spill coffee on the woman. "I'll bet they don't even know what the animals they killed for this looked like," she writes. Most of the other poems here are good, though Kuypers' emotionality can become intense, if not bewildering.


Ted Warnell, Editor, A Room Without Walls

Visited Scars tonight — nice site, cool content — fast, too. Very nice. I heard of Kuypers, well, InterBang and almost everywhere else on the web — she one productive artist.


The Prose Garden (on Janet Kuypers)

Janet Kuypers, 26, is art director for a Chicago publishing group and publisher of her own literary magazine. Her works have appeared in print and on the Internet. Through her own experiences, she peers into the emotional fiber underlying society's responsibilities to itself, to its loved and unloved ones, and to its earth. She sees for us all.


They Won't Stay Dead, Book Reviews (on "Hope Chest in the Attic")

Janet rules. Period. Generally, "Poetry" bores me, but more often than not, "ignores" me, but not Janet's. There's so many feelings and emotional heartache in her works, that many of her pieces can still moisten my eyes and heave my chest even after umpteenth readings. Sometimes raw, sometimes polished, sometimes shocking in its honesty, and always moving, Janet's writing continually manages to wring some sort of reaction from the reader. One can almost see the tears dripped on the manuscripts, nakedly displayed for all who care to see, be it her tears, or yours. It's packed with human feelings, much of which concerns feminist issues, but don't let that put you off. This is not Riot Girl ranting, but rather the fears and feelings of a highly intelligent, articulate and talented modern woman. Very emotional, very readabel and very recommended. An absolute must for poetry/prose enthusiasts.


Tony Saunders

I like the poem entitled The Room of the Rape. She has a lot of poems and I hope I can find time to read the rest of them. Good job and keep up the good work.


William Slaughter, Editor, Mudlark

I have visited SCARS (an odd phrasing but rightly so) and compliment (Kuypers) for the energy and intelligence with which she has contructed—are constructing—the web site. There is much to attract and hold visitors there, make them feel at home.

I do appreciate her passionate presence on the web. Her site is a lively place in both linguistic and human senses.


Zack Butler, Editor, The Basement and The Closet

I found (Kuypers') work very entertaining.